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Broeker v. Colvin

United States District Court, W.D. Washington, Tacoma

August 20, 2014

WILLIAM DOUGLAS BROEKER, Plaintiff,
v.
CAROLYN W. COLVIN, Acting Commissioner of the Social Security Administration, Defendant.

ORDER ON PLAINTIFF'S COMPLAINT

J. RICHARD CREATURA, Magistrate Judge.

This Court has jurisdiction pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 636(c), Fed.R.Civ.P. 73, and Local Magistrate Judge Rule MJR 13 ( see also Notice of Initial Assignment to a U.S. Magistrate Judge and Consent Form, Dkt. No. 3; Consent to Proceed Before a United States Magistrate Judge, Dkt. No. 4). This matter has been fully briefed ( see Dkt. Nos. 11, 12, 13).

After considering and reviewing the record, the Court finds that the ALJ's assessment of the medical opinion of consultative examining psychologist Kathleen S. Mayers, PhD, was free of legal error, and supported by substantial evidence in the record. The ALJ's conclusion that Dr. Mayers did not opine limitations consistent with a finding of disability under the Act was a conclusion that is supported by substantial evidence in the record.

BACKGROUND

Plaintiff, WILLIAM DOUGLAS BROEKER, was born in 1975, and was 31 years old on the alleged disability onset date of February 15, 2007 ( see Tr. 186-187). Plaintiff graduated from high school, attending special education classes since grade school (Tr. 34). Plaintiff has work experience as an insulation installer, fast food worker, and plumber's assistant (Tr. 39-41). He last worked as a plumber's assistant (Tr. 38).

According to the ALJ, plaintiff has at least the severe impairments of "degenerative disk disease, epidural fibrosis, ankle arthritis, insomnia, depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, learning disorder by history, alcohol abuse in partial remission and pain disorder (20 CFR 404.1520(c))" (Tr. 12).

At the time of the hearing, plaintiff was living on acreage in a home with his three children (Tr. 32-34). His mother and stepfather also lived on the acreage in a different home ( id. ).

PROCEDURAL HISTORY

Plaintiff filed applications for disability insurance ("DIB") benefits pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 423 (Title II), and Supplemental Security Income ("SSI") benefits pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1382(a) (Title XVI) of the Social Security Act, which were denied initially and following reconsideration ( see Tr. 100-02, 106-10, 186-93). Plaintiff's requested hearing was held before Administrative Law Judge Rebekah Ross ("the ALJ") on May 4, 2012 ( see Tr. 28-68). On June 21, 2012, the ALJ issued a written decision in which the ALJ concluded that plaintiff was not disabled pursuant to the Social Security Act ( see Tr. 7-27).

In plaintiff's Opening Brief, plaintiff raises the following issues: (1) Whether or not the ALJ erred by failing to incorporate the medical opinions of Kathleen S. Mayers, Ph.D., in to the residual functional capacity ("RFC") assessment; and (2) Whether or not the ALJ's errors were harmless ( see Dkt. No. 11, p. 1).

STANDARD OF REVIEW

Pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 405(g), this Court may set aside the Commissioner's denial of social security benefits if the ALJ's findings are based on legal error or not supported by substantial evidence in the record as a whole. Bayliss v. Barnhart, 427 F.3d 1211, 1214 n.1 (9th Cir. 2005) ( citing Tidwell v. Apfel, 161 F.3d 599, 601 (9th Cir. 1999)).

DISCUSSION

Plaintiff argues that the ALJ improperly rejected the functional limitations opined by consultative examining psychologist Kathleen S. Mayers, PhD. Dkt. No. 11, pp. 2-3. Specifically, plaintiff argues that the ALJ erred by failing to incorporate Dr. Mayers' opinion that she was unsure whether or not plaintiff would be able to maintain attention and concentration during a normal eight-hour work day into the RFC finding (Tr. 512). Plaintiff also argues that the ALJ erred by failing to adopt Dr. Mayers' opinion that the "[mental status examination ("MSE")] indicates that [plaintiff] is sometimes, but not consistently capable of understanding, remembering and carrying out three-stage instructions (Tr. 511)". The ALJ gave no reason to reject Dr. Mayers' opinions. Instead, the ...


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